CARPology 3 Month Subscription (Worldwide) From £14.25
Subscribe
Share
Share
Pin
Features
21 Mar 2017
by CARPology
7 simple ways to avoid a nightmare hook pull
Because having worked so hard to hook one, the last thing you want to do is lose it…

1 First off: playing off the clutch…

A: Setting the clutch in advanced is key to ensuring it reacts at the right tension, but do this by pulling the line through the guides when loading the rod, not directly from the reel like we all tend to do.

B: Controlling a running fish can easily be achieved on some reels by applying the palm of your hand to the spool skirt.

C: When you invest in a good front drag, it will probably have felt washers in the assembly. These will be grease impregnated, however, over time they become compressed and reduced in effectiveness. Get a reel service at one of the good dealers who do servicing or get the manufacturer to do it. It will be worth it.

D: When storing any reel, try to do so with the drag knob loosened off. This will extend the performance by ensuring the washer assembly isn’t permanently compressed.

E: Always have a check now and again under the surface of the drag knob. Reels received a lot of grunge and grit especially the stuff that bounces up during big downpours.

2 Plan it out in advance

Do not simply cast out and hope that you will be able to land the carp you hook. Think about where you are going to cast and when the carp takes and runs in ‘any’ direction how can you control it. If it kites left, right, runs towards you do you know what you are going to do? If not, then don’t put them out till you do know.

3 Drop the lead

When the lead is ditched, it’s less likely to snag on weed and such like and you tend to have a more direct line of contact with the carp. Also, when the lead is dumped, the carp usually come higher up in the water and the higher they are the less likely they are to find safety.

4 Lead them in

Like a dog on a lead. The rod you use should be an extension of your arm and not a ‘tug-of-war’ between carp and angler. Whatever rod you use, it should guide the fish in. There is no need to ‘bend into the fish’ unless it is going into snags that you have to stop it. Use it as a lever and not a longbow (no pun intended Daiwa and your DF model!) and you will lose a lot less.

5 Don’t rush it

There isn’t a time limit on landing the carp so don’t rush it. Yes, you can never be sure you are going to land it until it’s in the net, but it will be ready when it’s ready and not before. With experience you will know when it’s ready for netting but as a rule of thumb, when its head comes up it’s about ready. Extend that net and draw the carp in but don’t chase it with a rushed netting. Sometimes carp take a minute to land and sometimes ten minutes… don’t rush it or you will regret it.

6 Be smooth

The smooth approach is the best approach. If you are smooth the fish is more likely to be predictable and less likely to jag and weave as you are playing it. When a carp bangs from side-to-side, changes direction and panics, that’s when the hook will pull. Whether you are moving the rod, reaching for the net, adjusting the clutch, pushing the net out etc., do it smoothly.

7 Catch plenty

The best way to learn how NOT to lose fish is to catch and land plenty. Whether they ten, fifteen or twenty-pound, the more you catch, the better you will become at landing them. A carp is a carp is a carp and often a spirited ten-pounder is harder to control than a pulsing thirty-pounder.

Also Recommended
How to make sure you land 'em and not lose 'em!
15/11/2016
Features
How to make sure you land 'em and not lose 'em!
How not to lose the carp you've worked so hard to hook
15/11/2016
Features
How close should you fish to snags?
28/02/2017
Features
How close should you fish to snags?
When fishing to snags, how do you know how close to cast?
28/02/2017
Features
How to fish to a reedbed
18/08/2016
Features
How to fish to a reedbed
Fish expert, Simon Scott once said "If there are reeds present, the carp will 9 times out of 10 be found there."
18/08/2016
Features
Bivvy 101 #2
26/10/2014
Columnists
Bivvy 101 #2
John Hannent consigns another three subjects that he particularly loathes and despises in carp fishing…
26/10/2014
Columnists
Why you should watch your bobbins
10/04/2017
Features
Why you should watch your bobbins
Ellis Brazier offers his thoughts on fishing for liners, and what those lifts and drops on the bobbin actually mean
10/04/2017
Features
How to find the fish this spring
10/04/2017
Features
How to find the fish this spring
One of the key elements to spring success - get this bit right and you’re laughing
10/04/2017
Features
What matters more? Hook size or pattern?
07/04/2017
Features
What matters more? Hook size or pattern?
We ask our team of experts...
07/04/2017
Features
How to tell the difference between different strains of carp
07/04/2017
Features
How to tell the difference between different strains of carp
Here's your guide to understanding each strain of carp you'll find here in the UK courtesy of fish expert, James Anderson
07/04/2017
Features
Do slack lines cost anglers fish?
07/04/2017
Features
Do slack lines cost anglers fish?
We ask Terry Hearn...
07/04/2017
Features
How to take the perfect self-take
06/04/2017
Features
How to take the perfect self-take
Follow these simple steps to take the perfect self-take every time
06/04/2017
Features
5 essentials for early spring fishing
04/04/2017
Features
5 essentials for early spring fishing
We ask four experts what their top five items are
04/04/2017
Features
Does light scare off fish?
04/04/2017
Features
Does light scare off fish?
Does light scare fish? I once heard if you shone a torch into the water you could see the carp but it doesn’t spook them. Is that correct? Wiliam Reeves, via email
04/04/2017
Features